Dating jensen speakers code

04 Feb

Subsequently, Jensen speakers in the 40s, 50s, and 60s became commonly featured in major amplifier production, including amplifiers produced by Fender, Ampeg, and Gibson.Sometimes there is also another series of numbers stamped on the piece, this is the OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) part numbers above or below the EIA code, and in some cases parts makers elected not to include the EIA codes, so not all parts have them.These "Code" formats were not completely standardized, but a little deciphering will generally yield the info that's needed to identify the speaker in question.That’s probably a moot point, though—experience tells me that most original speakers in amps of that age are substantially fatigued and generally sound very weak. It's a great-sounding speaker, but with a sensitivity rating of 100 d B, it’s relatively efficient and would probably be pretty loud in that amp.Let’s take a look at a couple speakers from Warehouse Guitar Speakers ( so I can better explain this.

Warning: All tube amplifiers contain lethal voltages.

The most dangerous voltages are stored in electrolytic capacitors, even after the amp has been unplugged from the wall.

There are several ways of identifying a manufacturer, or particular part number of a component in most audio gear that's been manufactured since the mid 1950s.

There's an EIA (Electronic Industries Association) code that identifies the manufacturer, or company, sometimes stamped (either in ink, or metal embossing, or ID tag) on the particular component - in this case the speaker.

Fender has used only a handful of different speaker types over the years.

Here’s a list of brands along with their EIA codes.

For example if you have 220325 on a speaker, you can tell that it's a Jensen speaker, but the year is either 1973, 1963, or 1953 from the '3', and the '25' is the week of production.